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The Political Economy of Urban Schools

The Political Economy of Urban Schools PDF Author: Martin T. Katzman
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674685765
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 268

Book Description

The Political Economy of Urban Schools

The Political Economy of Urban Schools PDF Author: Martin T. Katzman
Publisher: Harvard University Press
ISBN: 9780674685765
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 268

Book Description


The New Political Economy of Urban Education

The New Political Economy of Urban Education PDF Author: Pauline Lipman
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ISBN: 1136760008
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 226

Book Description
Urban education and its contexts have changed in powerful ways. Old paradigms are being eclipsed by global forces of privatization and markets and new articulations of race, class, and urban space. These factors and more set the stage for Pauline Lipman's insightful analysis of the relationship between education policy and the neoliberal economic, political, and ideological processes that are reshaping cities in the United States and around the globe. Using Chicago as a case study of the interconnectedness of neoliberal urban policies on housing, economic development, race, and education, Lipman explores larger implications for equity, justice, and "the right to the city". She draws on scholarship in critical geography, urban sociology and anthropology, education policy, and critical analyses of race. Her synthesis of these lenses gives added weight to her critical appraisal and hope for the future, offering a significant contribution to current arguments about urban schooling and how we think about relations between neoliberal education reforms and the transformation of cities. By examining the cultural politics of why and how these relationships resonate with people's lived experience, Lipman pushes the analysis one step further toward a new educational and social paradigm rooted in radical political and economic democracy.

Ghetto Schooling

Ghetto Schooling PDF Author: Jean Anyon
Publisher: Teachers College Press
ISBN: 9780807736623
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 248

Book Description
In this disturbing but ultimately hopeful personal account, Jean Anyon provides compelling evidence that the economic and political devastation of America's inner cities has robbed schools and teachers of the capacity to successfully implement current strategies of educational reform. She argues that without fundamental change in government and business policies and the redirection of major resources back into the schools and the communities they serve, urban schools are consigned to failure, and no effort at raising standards, improving teaching, or boosting achievement can occur. Based on her participation in an intensive four-year school reform project in the Newark, New Jersey public schools, the author vividly captures the anguish and anger of students and teachers caught in the tangle of a failing school system. Ghetto Schooling offers a penetrating historical analysis of more than a century of government and business policies that have drained the economic, political, and human resources of urban populations. Provocative and controversial, this book reveals the historical roots of the current crisis in ghetto schools and what must be done to reverse the downward spiral.

Detroit and the New Political Economy of Integration in Public Education

Detroit and the New Political Economy of Integration in Public Education PDF Author: Curtis L. Ivery
Publisher: Springer Nature
ISBN: 3030997960
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 171

Book Description
This edited volume analyzes a little-known but important juncture in the history of racial integration and public education during the Obama administration through the advent of the Trump administration, which also marks a significant transition of US racial politics and race relations from its foundations in civil rights movements of the 1950s/60s. Focusing on the City of Detroit, which via the historic Supreme Court case, Milliken v. Bradley, stands as the central site of analysis for these broader national dynamics of race, education, and integration—what we term as a “new political economy of integration”—this volume offers a multidisciplinary perspective on the critical role integration must play in the project of America becoming a multiracial democracy as US populations continue to grow more diverse and will soon transform the nation into a multiracial majority for the first time in its history.

The Political Economy of Education

The Political Economy of Education PDF Author: Mark Gradstein
Publisher: MIT Press
ISBN: 9780262262880
Category : Business & Economics
Languages : en
Pages : 192

Book Description
A theoretical framework for analyzing the complex relationship of education, growth, and income distribution. The dominant role played by the state in the financing, regulation, and provision of primary and secondary education reflects the widely-held belief that education is necessary for personal and societal well-being. The economic organization of education depends on political as well as market mechanisms to resolve issues that arise because of contrasting views on such matters as income inequality, social mobility, and diversity. This book provides the theoretical framework necessary for understanding the political economy of education—the complex relationship of education, economic growth, and income distribution—and for formulating effective policies to improve the financing and provision of education. The relatively simple models developed illustrate the use of analytical tools for understanding central policy issues. After offering a historical overview of the development of public education and a review of current econometric evidence on education, growth, and income distribution, the authors lay the theoretical groundwork for the main body of analysis. First they develop a basic static model of how political decisions determine education spending; then they extend this model dynamically. Applying this framework to a comparison of education financing under different regimes, the authors explore fiscal decentralization; individual choice between public and private schooling, including the use of education vouchers to combine public financing of education with private provision; and the social dimension of education—its role in state-building, the traditional "melting pot" that promotes cohesion in a culturally diverse society.

City Schools and City Politics

City Schools and City Politics PDF Author: John Portz
Publisher:
ISBN:
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 216

Book Description
An explanation of why some US cities are better at educational reform than others. It relates education to politics, showing how the whole village can be mobilized to better educate tomorrow's citizens. It is based on an 11-city study of civic capacity and urban education.

Intersectionality and Urban Education

Intersectionality and Urban Education PDF Author: Carl A. Grant
Publisher: IAP
ISBN: 1623967341
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 335

Book Description
In urban education, “urban” is a floating signifier that is imbued with meaning, positive or negative by its users. “Urban” can be used to refer to both the geographical context of a city and a sense of “less than,” most often in relation to race and/or socioeconomic status (Watson, 2011). For Noblit and Pink (2007), “Urban, rather, is a generalization as much about geography as it is about the idea that urban centers have problems: problems of too many people, too much poverty, too much crime and violence, and ultimately, too little hope” (p. xv). Recently, urban education scholars such as Anyon (2005), Pink and Noblit (2007), Blanchett, Klinger and Harry (2009), and Lipman (2013) have elucidated the social construction of oppression and privilege for urban students, teachers, schools, families, and communities using intersectionality theories. Building on their work, we see the need for an edited collection that would look across the different realms of urban education—theorizing identity markers in urban education, education in urban schools and communities, thinking intersectionally in teacher education & higher education, educational policies & urban spaces—seeking to better understand each topic using an intersectional lens. Such a collection might serve to conceptually frame or provide methodological tools, or act as a reference point for scholars and educators who are trying to address urban educational issues in light of identities and power. Secondly, we argue that education questions and/or problems beg to be conceptualized and analyzed through more than one identity axis. Policies and practices that do not take into account urban students’ intertwining identity markers risk reproducing patterns of privilege and oppression, perpetuating stereotypes, and failing at the task we care most deeply about: supporting all students’ learning across a holistic range of academic, personal, and justice-oriented outcomes. Can educational policies and practices address the social justice issues faced in urban schools and communities today? We argue that doing intersectional research and implementing educational policies and practices guided by these frameworks can help improve the “fit.” Particular attention needs to be paid to intersectionality as a lens for educational theory, policy, and practice. As urban educators we would be wise to consider the intertwining of these identity axes in order to better analyze educational issues and engage in teaching, learning, research, and policymaking that are better-tuned to the needs of diverse students, families, and communities.

The Political Economy of Global Citizenship Education

The Political Economy of Global Citizenship Education PDF Author: Vanessa De Oliveira Andreotti
Publisher: Routledge
ISBN: 113491184X
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 240

Book Description
This edited collection offers analyses of ‘global citizenship education’ within and across different national contexts. This book illustrates the contingency of definitions, the complexities of juxtaposing demands and priorities in different educational contexts, and the difficulties and tensions of asking a question that is arguably one of the most pressing of our time: how should we live together in interdependent ecologies in a finite planet? In the discipline of education, where market imperatives and the dictatorship of 'effective replicable results' have laid siege to independent debates, this book aims to emphasize the importance of raising our intellectual game as educators to interrupt new and old problematic patterns of engagements, representations, uncomplicated solutions and conceptual straightjackets. Contributors to this volume address the tensions between homogenizing universalisms and parochial specifisms, ethnocentrisms and relativisms, deficit theorizations and romanticizations of difference, fantasies of supremacy and paralyses in guilt, the 'global' and the 'local'. The chapters take different approaches to map the origins, meanings, workings, ethics, politics and implications of initiatives, approaches, and conceptual frameworks related to the ideas of globalization, citizenship and education in different sites of knowledge production. This book was originally published as a special issue of Globalisation, Societies and Education.

Changing Urban Education

Changing Urban Education PDF Author: Clarence Nathan Stone
Publisher: Studies in Government & Public
ISBN:
Category : Education
Languages : en
Pages : 344

Book Description
With critical issues like desegregation and funding facing our schools, dissatisfaction with public education has reached a new high. Teachers decry inadequate resources while critics claim educators are more concerned with job security than effective teaching. Though urban education has reached crisis proportions, contending players have difficulty agreeing on a common program of action. This book tells why. Changing Urban Education confronts the prevailing naivete in school reform by examining the factors that shape, reinforce, or undermine reform efforts. Edited by one of the nation's leading urban scholars, it examines forces for change and resistance in urban education and proposes that the barrier to reform can only be overcome by understanding how schools fit into the broader political contexts of their cities. Much of the problem with our schools lies with the reluctance of educators to recognize the profoundly political character of public education. The contributors show how urban political contexts vary widely with factors like racial composition, the role of the teachers' union, and relations between cities and surrounding metropolitan areas. Presenting case studies of original field research in Baltimore, Chicago, Houston, and six other urban areas, they consider how resistance to desegregation and the concentration of the poor in central urban areas affect education, and they suggest how cities can build support for reform through the involvement of business and other community players. By demonstrating the complex interrelationship between urban education and politics, this book shows schools to be not just places for educating children, but also major employers and large spenders of tax dollars. It also introduces the concept of civic capacity—the ability of educators and non-educators to work together on common goals—and suggests that this key issue must be addressed before education can be improved. Changing Urban Education makes it clear to educators that the outcome of reform efforts depends heavily on their political context as it reminds political scientists that education is a major part of the urban mix. While its prognosis is not entirely optimistic, it sets forth important guidelines that cannot be ignored if our schools are to successfully prepare children for the future.

Political Economy of Public Education Finance

Political Economy of Public Education Finance PDF Author: Nandan K. Jha
Publisher: Lexington Books
ISBN: 1498590713
Category : Political Science
Languages : en
Pages : 143

Book Description
Political Economy of Public Education Finance takes a unique approach in examining distribution of public education spending across urban school districts in the USA. It provides a thorough and rigorous quantitative examination of the joint roles of school choice and political institutions in inequity in school district spending in the USA. This book additionally provides conceptual and empirical treatment to a topic within the vast school choice scholarship that has been studied the least so far: competition among school districts in the urban regional market. The author further offers insight into the role of political institutions in ensuring equity in public school spending. These institutions provide critical leadership in managing inter-school district competition in the regional context. Since equity in school finance is the outcome of interest in this book, it includes necessary and sufficient attention to the topic too.